THE ROLE OF MEAN PLATELET VOLUME, PLATELET DISTRIBUTION WIDTH AND PLATELET / LYMPHOCYTE RATIO IN DEVELOPMENT OF CEREBRAL VENOUS THROMBOSIS

Aslı Bolayır, Şeyda Figül Gökçe
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Abstract


Aim: Mean platelet volume (MPV) and platelet distribution width (PDW) are parameters that indicate platelet volume. It is assumed that large platelets are enzymatically and metabolically more active than small platelets. The relationship between elevated MPV and PDW values and arterial thrombosis has been demonstrated, but their roles in venous thrombosis are not fully understood. While the platelet / lymphocyte ratio (PLR), which is considered to be an inflammatory indicator, is known to be associated with many diseases, there are only a few studies in venous thrombosis. For this reason, our aim in this study is to establish the relationship between MPV, PDW and PLR values and cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST).Materials and Methods: Our study included 54 patients who were diagnosed with CVST in our clinic between January 2008 and September 2016, and 50 controls with similar age and sex. The patients and control groups were compared in terms of MPV, PDW and PLR values. In addition, the patient group was divided into two groups, according to parenchymal brain lesions, and the effect of MPV, PDW, and PLR on prognosis was also assessed.Results: While the MPV, PDW and PLR values were higher in the patient group compared to the controls, there was no significant difference between patients with and without parenchymal lesions. In addition, as MPV and PDW values for CVST development were determined as significant independent variables, optimal cut-off values were identified  8.85 for MPV, 15.75 for PDW and 168.53 for PLR in ROC analysis.Conclusion: As a result, MPV, PDW and PLR values were higher in patients with SVST than controls, however their prognostic significance was not determined. In addition, we may suggest that higher MPV and PDW values are new independent risk factors for CVST development.

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